What? No Grand Caravan?

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The Ten Most Optimistic Car Names, ever.

Sorry. I know this is a list, but this one’s kind of funny.

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40 responses to “What? No Grand Caravan?

  1. Cute. I did own a TRIUMPH (TR-2) and it was beat to shit when I bought it and it stayed that way, but it surely was fun to pretend I had a slick triumphal sports car.

    • I got a giggle when they came out with a Ford Focus. I mean, yeah, do that. You’re driving, after all. I drive a Golf. What a lame name.

      • “I drive a Golf. What a lame name.”

        Especially these days…..

        And what about the Ford Fusion, coming soon? Kinda scary.

  2. Ford Fusion? Like nuclear fusion?

    Imagine what would happen if two of those cars collide with each other. Ka Boom!

    • We’re all toast. I remember back with the K car reading an article that said the car companies would no longer name their cars, but would label them with letters or numbers. I am so happy the article was wrong.

  3. Hey, watchit! I own two Grand Caravans!
    CS, I had a TR-250 for a short time. Fun cars, just a wee bit dangerous, not to mention electrical issues. The company that made the electrical systems on many British cars was “Lucas Electrical.” The old joke was, “Why do the British drink warm beer? Because Lucas makes refrigerators!”

    • Don’t remember the 250 — the TR-2 was (of course) the predecessor to the TR-3, but was cuter because it had a sort of keystone-shaped grille (wider at the top) rather than the smile of the 3′s grille. I still have the wrench (kind of like an Allen wrench, but 4-sided instead of 6-sided) that had to be used to open the hood — um — bonnet and trunk. And OH YES, good old Lucas. Lucas was the cause, for better or worse (a little of each), of my meeting a mechanic with whom I would then spend the next 7 years, even after I sold the car.

      • The Brits call the backside of a car “the boot.”

        Once I was in a club in England, and spotted a poster for a “boot sale.” I thought it was about selling old shoes.

        Nay. Vendors line up their cars, throw open the boot, and sell what they have stocked. Sort of like a flea market.

    • But wasn’t that a cool car? Man.

  4. The ’67 TR-250 was the 6-cylinder TR-4, called the TR-6 the following year. I liked small sports cars. Whenever we were going anywhere with a group, It was me, my girl (or “chick”) and my car. Sorry, no riders! Although we did fit 4 people into an MG-B GT once!

    • MG-B GT, wow. That was some kind of cramped. You could take the seats out of the TR-2, so one year three friends sat toboggan-style as I drove around Newport. And that space was just barely long enough to sleep in, so while they had to sleep on the sand I got to wake up untouched by morning fog inside my little car.

    • Yes! Why couldn’t I remember that? I’d been told I had to go there, I did, it was great.

      • And I hope you visited the Museum of Transportation while you were there. It’s on the edge of Covent Garden.

        Absolutely fascinating. My wife thought she wouldn’t like it, but I had to drag her away after several hours in the museum. Everything about London’s very complex public transportation system. (NYC also has a subway museum which is good, too. It’s out in Brooklyn.)

        • Dang, I didn’t go there. I had like 48 hours to do London and I was basically running (and minding the gap) from tube stop to tube stop. Big fun, but I bet I missed 90 percent of the stuff I should have seen.

  5. Here is my favorite car that I have owned and I have owned a few. Actually, I owned two identical red ones. I would just swap the plates and drive away! It was the best car for drive-ins!

    • …where you and your date would indulge in Scripture reading? Nice!

      • Actually, we were at the “snuggling” stage of our relationship. She was a “born again” so we actually saw a movie. “You catholic girls start much too late!” I would back into the space at the drive-in, fold down the seats, armrest and back wall that divided the space behind the seats to the trunk, put up curtains around the side windows and across the front seats that she made, fluffed up the pillows, opened up the sleeping bags that zippered together and looked out the back window. Ah, the old days! We drove that car cross-Country, camping as we went. I gave that car to my brother, who still has it!

    • Mario,

      Your Chargers and Catholic girls rock! I am from Michigan and my first four cars were all born in Detroit…because that’s how most people from Michigan make car buying decisions. The last two American cars I owned I had replace the engines….so that cured me from buying American cars for good…my last two cars were from Sweden and Japan and only had to change batteries, tires, and wipers on both of them.

      Recently my ex-wife and I took our son out to dinner during Parents’ Weekend and I ordered a German beer and it really floored her…she asked me what happenend to Mr. Only Buy American….who said you can’t teach an old dog a new trick?

      Stop picking on Catholic girls…two of my favorite women are from that tribe. :)

      • I replaced the engine in my Voyager after 167, 000 miles. I had a 1982 Chevy that went 280,000 miles on the engine, but I got “T-boned” and totaled the car. It did have a junk Trany, but It had a lifetime warranty, so I adapted. I want to buy an American car, the most American car that I can, which is the Toyota Camry. I don’t get all weepy thinking of American union auto-workers loosing their jobs, except I don’t like to see anyone in America loose their jobs. As to American beer, I am not a drinker, however, I do enjoy a beer once of twice a year, and when he’s not smashing bottles, Jim Koch makes a mean wheat beer!

    • Wow Mario,

      My Japanese car is a Camry too…not as much power as my Volvo wagon…but that Camry starts up every morning like a champ. I am at 99,500 something miles and she is still as tight and as solid as day I bought her. I miss my old wagon, but she hit 185K and needed four grand worth of fix ups…so I walked away. I loved that wagon and felt like my sons were in a very safe tank while we rode in it. Nowadays I drive a green Toyota with the Palin half of a McCain/Palin bumper sticker on the bumper. If you see me, beep your horn.

    • Doesn’t the brass door knocker drive you bananas each time you hit a bump or go over a speed bump? How in the heck did you get a knocker to stay on your Caravan? Duct tape or super glue?

      • It’s magnetic. A friend put it on my hood, just out of view from the driver’s seat. It would clang each time I drove over a bump. I would stop and look under the van but could never find the thing until I got home and saw it there! When people ask me why I have a door knocker on the back of my van, I tell them that the door bell is broken!

  6. I would have thought Econoline would have made it in there….but I guess it’s not a car.

  7. My first car was a Fiat (Fix it again, Tony). Then I had a Volvo P1800 that I really should have hung onto, but my mechanic moved to New Jersey. Present car is a Subaru Impreza Outback Sport, about two too many names for most DMV forms. Before that, a Geo Prizm, another car that I really should have kept. I guess “Impreza” says something, but it’s really not that impressive–every other car in NH is a Subaru.

    • Weren’t Subarus once marketed as “New England’s Solution,” or something like that? I seem to remember flying to CT for a job interview and watching TV in my hotel that night, and there were these ads that made me think, “Crap. Now I have to buy a Subaru.”

  8. Mario,

    I hope that you have paid your friend back for the knocker prank he/she played on you.

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