We are judged by how we treat the people who need us

The state of Connecticut, in an effort to balance a budget, closed an office that provided sign language interpreters for people who are hard of hearing or deaf.

I wrote about this for the Courant.

Advertisements

6 responses to “We are judged by how we treat the people who need us

  1. As far as healthcare is concerned, interpreters being necessary for adequate access, should be paid for by health insurance if the provider doesn’t keep one or two on staff.
    But yeah….
    Good luck getting that from the cartel.

    Privatization of this service, like all neoliberal privatization schemes, is not going to be adequate to meet the need.

    • It hasn’t been so far. People who are seeking private interpreters since the closing of this office are having a hell of a time.

      • Once they find some, they should concentrate on getting some lawyers together and start suing people…institutions, agencies, anybody who does not provide interpreters as a matter of business as usual…to force compliance under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

        Then you might see these institutions, agencies, anybody who does not provide interpreters (ramps) as a matter of business as usual, more willing to support the State agency.

        • That’s a discussion that started pretty quickly after this was announced. There are several CT state agencies that may not be living up to their constitutional requirements.

          • The law demands people with disabilities be accommodated. Not just some people. Not just some disabilities.

            The healthcare provider who has a ramp into the office should be sued if there is no access to interpreters. The same should be applied to SNAP offices, Social Security offices, any HHS agency, IRS offices, (State or Federal), any realtor or property management service that handles rentals, any public service or business operation that caters to the general public.

            Then you’ll see some blowback.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s