In which I get the phrase “hind tit” into the Houston Chronicle:

lewishine-nationalarchiveMy former colleague and boss, Kyrie O’Connor, wrote this for the Houston Chronicle, about the rise of the working class in academia and research.

Beyond my coarse phrase, it’s a really well-done piece. Kudos to Kyrie!

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3 responses to “In which I get the phrase “hind tit” into the Houston Chronicle:

  1. So….you can take the girl out of the hillbilly but not the hillbilly out of the girl?
    Is this why regional/ethnic stereotypes persist?

    And I wonder if any of the scholars mentioned have examined whether such White ethnic cultural stereotypes discussed persisted, in various degrees, as those immigrants pushed West past the Mississippi.

    • It’s interesting. Mine certainly did push west, but not by much. There has to be scholarship about the White ethnic groups who pushed westward, farther. I know when I read “Hillbilly Elegy,” I kept thinking, “Yep. That’s my family.” We are of a type.

      • It is interesting.
        We’ve always had strong ethnic identities here, and there are some similarities to those old fashioned stereotypes in our contemporary public attitudes. Mostly though, public attitudes concerning such stereotypes have changed…evolved…into something more…well…pleasant. The worst of our prejudices are reflected in stereotypes concerning race, religion and class. And politics. And there’s a peculiar prejudice concerning how long you’ve lived here…and where you’re from…what State. Mostly it’s all in good fun. But some folk can be downright unfriendly to some transplants. Especially these days. But there’s a pioneer heritage that negates all that in the wake of disaster or tragedy. I think that’s common in the West. At least in those places not completely despoiled of that heritage by mass urbanization.

        My nonEnglish ethnic heritage was linked by the family to more ideological characteristics than the usual cultural aspects. (See here or here.)

        It appears you can take the boy out of the radicalism but not the radicalism out of the boy.

        My English heritage is pure WASP. You can’t get much more WASPy than my paternal roots. Not exactly as boring as it sounds, but by around 1800 we were the people creating the stereotypes, not living them. Unless you consider WASP a stereotype, I suppose.

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