Oh, FFS

Stacks of US currency in ascending graph patternDespite the recent good economic news — for some, anyway — women will not achieve pay equity for another 136 years.

So that means that if I eat my greens, exercise daily, and keep up with my prayers, I will STILL BE DEAD BEFORE THIS HAPPENS GODDAMMIT.

Advertisements

3 responses to “Oh, FFS

  1. As long as current law puts the onus on employees to expose and bring action against employers, with little or no support or protection against employer retaliation available from governments, actual pay equity in the markets will not progress.

    Existing national law must change to reflect greater support and protection of employees, standardization of data collection, analysis and classification, (clarification of law), and enhanced DOJ/SAG powers to enforce the law. (Discrimination is unlawful, a crime.)

    History has shown that proactive protection of victims’ rights, within the law, is necessary for justice. Labor law, particularly wage and hour law, should enjoy no exemption from any due diligence expected from lawmakers and law enforcement in other areas of anti-discrimination law…civil rights.

    You know I’m no fan of identity politics, but, unless and until Womens can effectively frame this as a civil rights issue, discourse won’t move much must past the tsk tsk tsk of bourgeois reformists and the empty rhetoric and tokenism of professional politicians.

    In a society that equates money with speech, a society based upon protections for all forms of speech individual and collective, but moneyed speech in the particular, an existing and pernicious absence of labor market pay equity on a broad scale, apparently the result of unlawful activity, (intentional or otherwise), becomes an issue of…well…suffrage. It’s a 15th Amendment Issue. It’s a 1st Amendment Issue. It’s a Title VII Issue. (The Supreme Court has already said that.) As long as current law puts the onus on employees to expose and bring action against employers, with little or no support or protection against employer retaliation available from governments, actual pay equity in the markets will not progress.

    History has shown that proactive protection of victims’ rights, within the law, is necessary for justice. Labor law, particularly wage and hour law, should enjoy no exemption from any due diligence expected from lawmakers and law enforcement in other areas of anti-discrimination law…civil rights.

    Existing national law must change to reflect greater support and protection of employees, standardization of data collection, analysis and classification, (clarification of law), and enhanced DOJ/SAG powers to enforce the law. (Discrimination is unlawful, a crime.)

    In a society that equates money with speech, a society based upon protections for all forms of speech individual and collective, but moneyed speech in the particular, an existing and pernicious absence of labor market pay equity on a broad scale, apparently the result of unlawful activity, (intentional or otherwise), becomes an issue of…well…suffrage. The actual damage realized by a protected class transcend neoliberal labor law obfuscation and expand class standing into the larger sphere of foundational constitutional law. It’s a 15th Amendment Issue. It’s a 1st Amendment Issue. It’s a Title VII Issue. (The Supreme Court has already said that.)

    It’s a Civil Rights Issue. Treat it like one. Again. And progress might start to pick up. You know I’m no fan of identity politics, but, unless and until Womens can effectively frame this as a civil rights issue, discourse won’t move much must past the tsk tsk tsk of bourgeois reformists and the empty rhetoric and tokenism of professional politicians.

  2. Really discouraging. Maybe our great times 3-4 granddaughters will see equity? I hope they are wrong and can shave 100 years off that estimate.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s