Category Archives: Modern life-as-we-know-it

What if we treated all consent like society treats sexual content?

metaphors-footer1And thanks, Sharon. You can read more here, and thanks Cynical, for the link.

Some weirdness on the coverage of women’s sports:

clickCynical sends this, a Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting report that says despite the popularity of women’s sports today, the topic got more coverage back in the late ’90s, early ’00s.

Hmmm….

That damn Confederate battle flag…

COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 18:  The South Carolina and American flags fly at half mast as the Confederate flag unfurls below at the Confederate Monument June 18, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Legislators gathered Thursday morning to honor their co-worker Clementa Pinckney and the eight others killed yesterday at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

An online MoveOn campaign to remove the Confederate flag from all government buildings — and most particularly from South Carolina’s capitol building — is bucking the South Carolina Heritage Act that says:

CERTAIN FLAGS OF THE CONFEDERACY SHALL BE FLOWN OR BE DISPLAYED ON THE GROUNDS OF THE STATE CAPITOL COMPLEX, AND WHICH PROHIBITS THE REMOVAL OF THESE CONFEDERATE FLAGS ON THE STATE HOUSE GROUNDS AND THE REMOVAL, CHANGING, OR RENAMING OF ANY LOCAL OR STATE MONUMENT, MARKER, MEMORIAL, SCHOOL, OR STREET ERECTED OR NAMED IN HONOR OF THE CONFEDERACY OR THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT WITHOUT THE ENACTMENT OF A JOINT RESOLUTION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY APPROVING SAME ADOPTED BY A TWO-THIRDS VOTE OF THE MEMBERSHIP OF EACH HOUSE…

There’s more. Click the link. And the flag is padlocked in place, though there’s talk of introducing a bill to remove the flag. That should be a fascinating discussion and I hope to be able to keep you apprised of it here because as we all know, there’s heritage worth sharing, and then there’s heritage that’s worth learning from, but not necessarily displaying. Every Caucasian benefited from the U.S. slave economy. Wouldn’t you think more white people would be arguing for its removal from public places? It’s like waving the bloody flag of someone you just shot. Heritage, my ass.

(Full disclosure: I owned a Confederate flag as a child, and floating around somewhere is a photo of me and my step-grandfather on a porch in Crane, Mo., where I am holding that flag. I was 8, maybe 9, and my reading list was short. That is a lame excuse, I know, but I got older, started reading, and left off childish and hurtful things. Back to your regularly-scheduled blog post:)

From a 2014 interview, S.C. Gov. Nikki Haley said “not a single CEO” has complained about the damn thing. And she’s an Indian-American, so they’ve obviously fixed racism. So there’s that.

And thanks, Cynical, for the link.

How Section 8 became a slur

In the recent McKinney, Texas, pool fight that resulted in charges of police brutality and one police officer quitting the force, one of the slurs yelled by white residents included Section 8 housing.

indexHere’s Vox’s take on what that means. And here’s the Washington Post’s Wonkblog, which contains this gem:

In a broad sense, this is an American tradition: conflating where people live with who they are. “We’ve been doing that as a society for a really, really long time,” says Lawrence Vale, an MIT professor who has written extensively about public housing. “And it’s been racialized for a lot of that history.”

Fascinating, yes? And thanks, Ebony, for the link.

He caved

TaxGEOn Friday, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, in the words of one lobbyist, significantly rolled back his proposed corporate taxes, and he proposed the legislature allow him to cut up to 1.5 percent of any line item in the budget.

Whee!

The budget process in this state is pretty crappy as it is, and this just makes it crappier. Already, legislators have fought to restore some of the governor’s original proposed cuts to human services at a critical time for this state’s must vulnerable residents — but so much for that because when some of the business community squawked about the governor’s proposed corporate tax increase — GE even threatened to leave, though that may have been corporate puffery on the eve of some company layoffs — the Gov. backed down.

Already, GE pays its CEO what is known in economic circles as a “shit-ton,” but yes! Let’s whine in the face of higher taxes. Here’s a bit more about GE’s record as a tax scofflaw. Bless. Their. Hearts.

(That deep thinker Joe Scarborough weighed in, saying he would stay in Connecticut because he likes the skiing and stuff, but would GE? Gosh, Joe. Thanks.)

From Betty Gallo, a lobbyist in the state, that 1.5 percent cut from a line item could mean:

·       $80 million in Medicaid (including both state and federal dollars);

·       $6.5 million for Community residential services in DDS;

·       $700,000 in Home Care for Elders;

·       $1.2 million in services for youth services in DMHAS;

·       $3 million in Day services for clients of DDS.

·       $1.8 million in Care4Kids

·       $2.5 million each for the community  colleges and CSU

and:

·       $1 million from the Housing and Homeless line

Several parts of Connecticut are winding up 100-day challenges to end homelessness. This is not the time to pull anyone’s foot off the pedal. And finally — and in closing, here’s a bit more about GE’s record as a tax scofflaw. Bless. Their. Hearts.

Some decisions aren’t economical

imagesHoward Schultz, Starbucks’ CEO, had this to say in regard to faith groups boycotting his company for its pro-marriage equality stance:

“Not every decision is an economic decision. Despite the fact that you recite statistics that are narrow in time, we did provide a 38% shareholder return over the last year. I don’t know how many things you invest in, but I would suspect not many things, companies, products, investments have returned 38% over the last 12 months. Having said that, it is not an economic decision to me. The lens in which we are making that decision is through the lens of our people. We employ over 200,000 people in this company, and we want to embrace diversity — of all kinds. If you feel, respectfully, that you can get a higher return than the 38% you got last year, it’s a free country. You can sell your shares in Starbucks and buy shares in another company. Thank you very much.

(That symbol on their logo? It’s the devil.)

(Not really.)

Think we’d ever see a statue like this here in the U.S.

She-Guardian-R2-528x920Mike the Heathen sent it to me.