The link between poverty and (mis)education

When it comes to economic inequality, and the cycle of poverty, I have been researching at my internship (New HaveScreen Shot 2018-01-30 at 2.32.06 PM.pngn Reads) how the lack of proper education contributes to the cycle of poverty.

Specifically, the lack of suitable education, or education at all, provided for women creates a cycle of illiteracy, which results in the inability to gain tools necessary to make an income.

Nearly two-thirds of illiterate adults worldwide are women, it is estimated that 496 million women 15 years of age and older are illiterate. The cycle of Screen Shot 2018-01-30 at 2.31.29 PM.pngpoverty is parallel to illiteracy rates. While efforts have been put in globally and nationally to improve the quality of education among women, those who missed out on the proper education early on in their formative years still feel the effects today. It is estimated that if a student is not reading proficiently by the 4th grade, that student has a 78 percebt chance of never catching up.

This is a factor to the wealth inequality and income inequality rampant in our country. While the statistics provide information globally, improper education among America’s youth definitely serve as a catalyst to perpetuate the income gap the nation faces.

By Sarah DeMatteis


And so we come to another glorious pause…

screen-shot-2017-01-31-at-1-08-00-pm…I am stepping away from Dating Jesus (again, I know) to focus my attentions elsewhere. I have done this before (many times, actually, and usually so I can focus on other writing). This is one of those times, and I just may return, but for all that feels important these days, driving traffic to a blog doesn’t rank very high on the list.

My only concern is that I’ll lose touch with the little community we’ve built here. So please. I’m at Don’t be a stranger. I will be cropping elsewhere, I promise.

4.1 Miles

This documentary, by Daphne Matziaraki, was nominated for a 2017 Academy Award. Here’s more.

And thanks, Leftover, for the link.

99 ways to fight Trump

screen-shot-2017-01-30-at-8-42-46-amRight here. Every day, do that one thing.

And thanks, Jan and Susan, for the link.

Dear Christian,

screenshot-2017-01-29-13-12-06You don’t know me, and I won’t pretend to know you, but we are at a critical juncture in our country and in our respective faiths and it’s important that we act and act quickly.

On Friday, the Republican president signed an ethically, legally, and morally questionable executive order that restricted immigration from seven nations — none of which have given birth to terrorists who have killed Americans, and you can read that in no less a source than The Daily Caller, which may be the only time I ever link to that woe-begotten publication.

The worldwide reaction has been predictably to the negative, and we, as believers, can do no less than to work our hardest against this man. If you voted for this man, you can no longer shrug that you voted for a racist. If you continue to support him, you are a racist, yourself, and racism has precisely no place in your Book. No amount of tweaking will change this — particularly when Pres. Bannon just last night fired the acting attorney general who refused to enforce his benighted ban.

WWJD? Stand up. Fight back. Swords up.

Go to @TrumpHotels and tell them your favorite travel memory.


The changing face of American immigrants


So Pew Research Center has looked at where this country’s immigrants have come from in the last 40 or so years. Interestingly, last fiscal year, most of our immigrants came from the Democratic Republic of Congo.